Categories & Search ↓

Criminal Justice Honors Society Comes To National Louis

alphaphisigma

By Richard Schak,  Criminal Justice Program Director

National Louis University has been approved for a chapter of the Alpha Phi Sigma (National Criminal Justice Honors Society). Our Chapter name is Phi Psi and we are accepting new members. The criteria for joining our chapter is as follows:

Undergraduate Students: Undergraduate students shall be enrolled in an institution represented by a chapter of Alpha Phi Sigma. They must have declared a major, minor or equivalent in criminal justice or a related field, have completed three full-time semesters or their equivalent. They must attain a minimum GPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale in their cumulative and criminal justice classes, and rank in the top 35% of their class. A minimum of four courses of the above course work shall be in the criminal justice field.

If you meet the above criteria and are interested in joining our new chapter, please email Chapter Advisors Mr. Rich Schak, Richard.schak@nl.edu or Dr. Dan McGuire, dmcguire3@nl.edu.

Daily Herald: NLU Alum Shows Teachers Creative Ways To Incorporate Technology

 

When a Glenbard South High School Spanish teacher came to National Louis University alum Stephanie Wallace for help in making a video, Wallace came up with an unexpected solution: have the students make their own mini-videos, speaking in Spanish, instead.

StudentsWithLaptopsWallace, who was profiled in the Daily Herald Oct. 13, works as an instructional technology specialist at the school, and her goal is to use technology as a tool to help students learn, rather than just learn technology for its own sake.

Continue reading »

NLU Prof’s Book Review Highlights Malala, Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Malala_Jacket.inddHere’s an entry in the “great minds think alike” department.  School Library Journal printed NLU Assistant Professor Toby Rajput’s book review of  Every Day is Malala Day, published by Second Story Press for second- to fourth-graders. On Friday, Oct. 10, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced it was awarding the Nobel Peace Prize to 17-year-old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl whom the Taliban shot in the head for championing girls’ right to go to school. Malala, who survived the shooting and attends school in the United Kingdom, shares this year’s Nobel Peace Prize with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian activist who fights child labor.

NLU’s Rajput, who is full-time Library faculty and also the Children’s and Youth Literature librarian for the university, quoted from Malala’s July 2013 speech to the United Nations, which ended with the words, “One child, one teacher, one pen and one book can change the world.”  Rajput concludes the review by describing the book as, “an effective introduction to an important social justice issue.”

Rajput also teaches School Library courses in NLU’s National College of Education for teachers who are adding the school library credential to their teaching licenses.

$1,500 Scholarship Requires 200-Word Entry

Are you an idea person? Do you have a sense of innovation? A company called Global English Editing is offering a $1,500 scholarship to a college student who has a great idea for  improving the future of the United States. Enter your 200-word essay by Dec. 31; you’ll find out if you’re a winner by Jan. 14, 2015. For more information, see the company’s website.
USimprovement

NLU Student Coach Monica Ramos Wins Award Honoring Latinas

Monica Ramos

Citing Monica Ramos’ dedication to empowering students, including students who are the first in their families to go to college, the Binational Institute of Human Development awarded her its Yolotlmeztli, or “Heart of the Moon,” award.

“Monica is a walking billboard that helping others through education is the best thing you can do,” said Allison Harrison, executive director of the Binational Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering immigrants and integrating them into society.

Continue reading »

In Honor of World Teachers Day, Share Your Views On Global Literacy

By James O’Meara, Ed.D.

On Oct. 5, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) celebrated the 20th anniversary of World Teachers’ Day, a day commemorating the adoption of the UNESCO/ILO Recommendations concerning the Status of Teachers in 1966.

The Chicago Declaration, shown in draft form below, represents a call for governments and multilateral agencies around the world to invest in the future of countries by building teacher capacity to meet the diverse learning needs of every girl and boy.

Continue reading »

Why I Love NLU Students

140922-rise-event-23-3555923143-O

Wow. What a start to Fall 2014. I just love our students. Honestly, they are the reason I get up in the morning, bounce along on the train and take a lovely walk from Union Station. I’ve been in Student Affairs for close to 15 years and I still get excited each new school year, including goose bumps of excitement as the buzz of returning students infects the campus.

I’m proud to say that I hope to be the NLU Difference. In a previous blog, I shared some of my vision for the National Louis Student Experience this year.  Last week, the Student Experience Team visited each campus with gifts, food and excitement to tell you all about our plans for this year. We had such a great time conversing with students, trying out a little Zumba (don’t worry, we won’t quit our day jobs), and displaying our blue and platinum pride.

Here are the top 3 reasons why I love NLU students:

Continue reading »

When One Leader Exits and Another Emerges: How NLU’s McCormick Center Spent 4 Years Planning For Succession

 

BloomAndOffutt

Paula Jorde Bloom, left, and Sue Offutt pose at an NLU reception in honor of Bloom’s 30 years of service and retirement.

 

Paula Jorde Bloom founded NLU’s McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership in 1985, and led it for its entire existence until now. So what happens when a founder decides to retire? She follows her own advice, as outlined in her books and thought leadership, and brings in her successor for thorough training (four years’ worth) before she takes the reins.

In their own words, here are what both women had to say about that experience.

Continue reading »

Can Academics Solve the Tricky Problem of Global Illiteracy? Two NLU Profs Give It Their Best Shot

shutterstock_182668274

Across the globe, 781 million adults cannot read or write, according to UNESCO.

Is it crazy to think academics can help developing nations solve that problem, even as those nations grapple with hunger, disease, lack of infrastructure and other quagmires?

Not after an enthusiastic conversation with Anthony Cree, O.A.M., an NLU visiting professor, and Professor James O’Meara, Director of NCE Program Analysis and Development  at NLU. The two Australian-born professors, who organize conferences which attract heads of state and education ministers from around the globe, talk passionately about how raising literacy levels can raise standards of living, improve health and spark learning in struggling nations.

Continue reading »

Celebrating Paula Bloom’s 30 Years As A Leader In Early Childhood Education

BloomAndOffutt

As Paula Bloom, Ph.D., left, retires, Sue Offutt, Ph.D., will take over the helm of the McCormick Center. The two spent four years mapping out the transition.

 

There were lots of hugs, laughter and even a few tears as the NLU and McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership communities celebrated Paula Jorde Bloom’s  (Ph.D.) 30 years at NLU and her retirement.

“She’s an icon and a rock star,” said Chip Donahue, Ph.D., dean of distance learning and technology at Erikson Institute. “You just need to say ‘Paula’ and everyone in the field knows who you mean.”

Bloom has been a national leader in the effort to professionalize the field of Early Childhood Education, both through her own teaching and mentoring and her leadership at the McCormick Center, which trains and coaches early childhood administrators, evaluates early childhood centers, performs research and advocates for quality early childhood education.

Much of the work is in creating standards for quality early childhood programming, and supporting the teachers and administrators who deliver it to children and families.

Bloom, who has written many books on Early Childhood Education and served on boards of national associations in the field, is retiring, but will still be available for advisement, and will continue to serve on some association boards.

The celebration was held Sept. 12 at the University Club in Chicago.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-36

Bloom poses with Safiyah Jackson, director of training for NCE grants, at Bloom’s retirement celebration.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-11

A luncheon honoring Paula Jorde Bloom, Ph.D., on her 30th anniversary at NLU and retirement was held at the University Club.

140912-NivineAtPaulaBloomlunch-9

Nivine Megahed, Ph.D., NLU president, welcomed guests to Paula Jorde Bloom’s anniversary and retirement celebration.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-22

Paula Jorde Bloom told attendees that it took her eight weeks to pack up her office, and she savored memories brought back by old photos, books and even a microfiche.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-5

NLU and McCormick Center faculty and staff, and other Early Childhood Education experts, greeted each other at Bloom’s celebration.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-26

Sue Offutt, Ph.D., director of the McCormick Center, welcomed McCormick faculty to the front area at the luncheon.

140912-paula-bloom-luncheon-30

Bloom reminisces with McCormick Center faculty at her celebration luncheon. (Photos by Nick Love.)

Watch the NLU Alumni Magazine for an in-depth story on how she created her life’s work.