Categories & Search ↓

Career Planning

How do you develop Administrative Leadership skills? When promoted into administration, writer found two resources helpful

shutterstock_290031071Enjoy this blog post from NLU’s McCormick Center for Early Leadership blog. In a recent Whole Leadership post on the McCormick blog, Teri Talan introduced administrative leadership by considering its definition and importance. This led Tarah Kadzielawski to wonder, how do you improve administrative leadership skills? She reflects on her experience as a strong teacher who was promoted into administration. She shares her journey, the advice she’d give her younger self, and her favorite resources for developing administrative leadership.

by Tarah Kadzielawski

READ MORE FROM THE WHOLE LEADERSHIP BLOG SERIES

In last week’s Whole Leadership post, Teri Talan started us in a new direction, Administrative Leadership. My personal background is similar to many other program leaders in our field—I was a strong teacher who was promoted into administration. In my personal experience with administrative leadership, I felt I could handle pedagogical leadership and thought I had many leadership essentials; however, I knew I was in need of some support and resources to build up my administrative leadership skills. (In hindsight I’m sure I was in need of more resources for pedagogical leadership and leadership essentials as well, but that is a different blog post.)

To build up my administrative leadership skills, I turned to the resources at my disposal. There were director’s networks—I was involved in—related to different funding sources such as Head Start and state pre-K. However, these didn’t provide the administrative leadership skill development that I sought. Two professional learning opportunities that I participated in did help develop my administrative leadership skills: Continue reading »

Students, It’s Time to Network for Your Future Job Don't wait until you have your diploma; start now

 

By: Christine Andrelczyk, NLU Career Services Advisor

shutterstock_56739871College is a busy time. Between classes, homework and exams, it can be easy to lose sight of the ultimate reason for attending college in the first place: your career. Nowadays, 70% of jobs are attained through networking, so be sure to take some time out of your busy schedule to start making valuable professional connections. Below are a few strategies you can use to build up your network while you’re still in school.

Start right away. A common misconception is that you only need to network when you’re actively job hunting. This is a myth! Just like any other investment, your network needs time to grow before you can begin reaping the benefits. Don’t wait until graduation to make your first connection. Start now by joining clubs or professional organizations and attending networking events on campus.

Put down the phone. Social media platforms like LinkedIn make networking quicker and easier than ever before, but that doesn’t mean all of your contacts should be digital. Instead, use social media as a jumping off point. Facebook and Twitter can be great places to find out about networking events happening on campus. Use LinkedIn to join professional groups that host regular, in-person meetings in your community. Social media can also help you spark a conversation with recruiters, alumni, and other professionals in your field.

It’s okay to feel awkward, but don’t shy away from networking because the idea of meeting new people sounds intimidating. Adopt a host mentality to boost your confidence in social situations. NLU Career Advisor Paula Rucci Voigt explains, “Hosts go out of their way to introduce others and make them aware of what they might have in common. Their goal is to help create connections between their guests in an effort to make them more comfortable.” By thinking of yourself as a host rather than a guest, you’re empowering yourself to take control of the situation and make sure everyone walks away satisfied.

Talk to your professors. You may be used to seeing your professors in the classroom, but they’re also experts in their given field or industry. Your professors can offer a wealth of knowledge about what it’s like to work in your field and different career options for your major. They may also have insight on what experiences you should gain during college to best transition into your future career.

Connect with professionals. The best way to learn about a particular job is to talk to someone who’s currently working in that position. Don’t hesitate to reach out to professionals in your field to schedule an informational interview. This is a brief, structured conversation where you can ask day-in-the-life questions about a particular job or company, or find out how to break into the field. If you’re not sure what job or field you’re interested in, don’t worry: These conversations can help you decide.

How To Stand Out at a Career Fair Follow these eight tips to make a positive impression

150303-educator-job-fair-014

By Consiglia M. Intile, MA, NCC
NLU Assistant Director of Career Services

See upcoming NLU Career Fairs here

Attending career fairs is an excellent strategy for job seekers. Most job seekers face the challenge of getting a face-to-face interview with employers;  career fairs give you an opportunity to shake hands with the employer’s representatives and make your first impression count. To make sure you create a positive lasting impression, follow these eight tips below.

1). Research, Record, and Review

Once you register for the career fair in advance, you will have the opportunity to view the companies that will be attending. You can upload your resume on each employer’s website so they will have a copy on file. Research the companies, read their mission statements, goals and values, and make a list of the companies that interest you. You can jot down the company name and its mission statement on a piece of paper and review it before the day of the career fair. Continue reading »

‘Tis the Season for Career Networking Continue your job search during the holidays

By Consiglia Intile, Assistant Director of Career Services, National Louis University

NetworkingHolidaysThe holidays are here and you decide to finally take a break from career searching to celebrate the festivities, because you have the notion that companies will not hire during the holiday, but this is in fact false. This is actually the time of year when employers have more free time since their colleagues take time off work. To make the best use of this time and kick your career search into high gear, here are some tips that will help you stay on top of your job search during the holidays. Also, continuing your search over the holidays shows employers you are hardworking and serious about finding a position and they will find this impressive. Continue reading »

Overcome Your Fear of Networking by Adopting a Host Mentality You're there to help others connect, not just for yourself

By Paula Rucci Voigt, National Louis University Career Development Office

networkingYou may have heard the phrase, “Your Network Is Your Net Worth.” Noting that studies have shown that networking is the most effective way to land a job, it is evident that networking is essential to the health of your personal brand, your career, and your job search strategy.

Dictionary.com defines networking as “a supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups having a common interest.” Sounds simple and straightforward, right? Continue reading »

The Networked Educator: Building Relationships For Your Career in Teaching By: Christine Andrelczyk, NLU Career Services Advisor

150303-educator-job-fair-014Networking is more than a buzzword: it is a tool, a plan, and a strategy. It can help you secure your first job, but also extends beyond that to form the foundation of your future career.

Statistics show that 70% of jobs are landed through networking[1]. Chances are you’ve heard of at least one friend or classmate getting recruited from LinkedIn, or scoring a job at a hiring event. Continue reading »

LinkedIn Rates NLU At Top Of University Rankings

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 12.13.56 PMIn October, LinkedIn, the popular career-oriented social media site, launched its University Rankings and University Finder for people seeking a college whose graduates get jobs in their chosen fields.

This is a rubber-meets-the-road test unlike any other rankings system, and National Louis University performed extremely well.  To gauge the results, LinkedIn taps into its own database of 300 million members and identifies the universities they attended and the desirable employers they work for. It then determines which universities produce the highest number of alumni who work for desirable employers in the fields in which they pursued their degrees.

Connections for Life

 

Helen Roy_Connections for Life

Connections for life. What does that really mean? When this poster went up on Michigan Avenue outside the Chicago campus, I began to wonder why we need connections for life, what it means to have connections for life, and what it takes to maintain those connections for life. I then found a great article posted 1 year ago titled, “Hire Economics: Why Applying to Jobs Is a Waste of Time,” and my questions started forming their own answers:

Continue reading »

What I hope to do with my master’s

shutterstock_191262146Being halfway through the awesome M.S. in Written Communication (MSWC) program, I have already created and begun implementing a post-graduation plan of action. A few months ago I took advantage of the adept services offered by the Career Development Office here at NLU and had my resume critiqued. My job has now become looking for a job, and the CDO was instrumental in assisting me in crafting a first-class resume that I can submit with total confidence to potential employers.

Continue reading »