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Influential ‘A Better Chicago’ Features Student Devine Drakes The nonprofit identifies true change-makers in providing access to education

Devine Drakes at National Louis University.

A Better Chicago profiled National Louis University student Devine Drakes, who is studying to become a bilingual psychologist.

Devine Drakes is not only an enthusiastic junior and student ambassador in National Louis University’s undergraduate program, she’s also part of #ABetterChicago, both literally and figuratively.

In the literal sense, Drakes was just featured in a story on the website of A Better Chicago, a leading non-profit organization which invests in promising models of education. A Better Chicago’s leaders believe everyone deserves access to a quality education, and that mission aligns so closely with National Louis University’s philosophy that ABC selected NLU as a grantee.

In the figurative sense, Drakes plans to devote her personal energy to creating a better Chicago as a bilingual psychologist.

Drakes has faced the challenges of growing up in Chicago’s far South side Roseland neighborhood and having her mother leave the family when she was in high school. Fortunately, her father has inspired her, encouraging her to aspire to her career goals and to remember to give back to her community.

A Better Chicago’s Danielle Viera wrote:

“There’s an undeniable energy that comes into the room with Devine Drakes—from her bubbly personality to her infectious smile, she exudes an excitement about life and the possibilities that her future holds. That bright future isn’t something she takes for granted as a girl who was born and raised in Roseland, a neighborhood on Chicago’s far south side. A junior at National Louis University and a student ambassador for their Pathways program, one of A Better Chicago’s grantees, Devine embodies one of our most deeply held beliefs: that education changes everything.”

Read the rest of A Better Chicago’s article here.

Learn more about National Louis University’s promising undergraduate program.