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All posts by Jason Sommer

Easy Homemade Ramen at Harold Washington College

On Friday, September 27, 2019, Kendall College at National Louis University participated in a cooking demonstration at Harold Washington College. Transfer students learned how to cook a healthy—yet tasty ramen meal in less than 30 minutes! See recipe below:

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS
PREP TIME: 10 MINUTES
COOK TIME: 20 MINUTES
TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES

Ingredients: 

Eggs
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup of chopped onions
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
4 cups reduced sodium veggie/chicken broth
4 cups of water
Bullion cups (to taste)
4 oz. shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Mirin
Few drop of fish sauce
Handful of bonito flakes (optional)
6 packs of ramen packets discarded except 1*
Pork belly
1 carrot, grated
2 cups of scallions

Directions:

  1. Heat olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add onion, garlic and ginger, and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes.
  2. Whisk in chicken broth, mushrooms, soy sauce, and 3 cups water
  3. Add fish sauce, Mirin, and bonito
  4. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until mushrooms have softened, about 10 minutes
  5. Place eggs in, bring to a boil and cook for 6 minutes. Set aside for 8-10 minutes
  6. Stir in noodles until loosened and cooked through, about 2-3 minutes, remove
  7. Poach protein in broth remove
  8. Blanch carrot in broth remove
  9. Strain broth
  10. Chop scallions
  11. Add noodles to bowl with broth, top with egg, carrots, and scallions
  12. Serve immediately

Many thanks to Chef Karl Benford for his demonstration! Please visit nl.edu/info to learn more about National Louis University.

   

A Response to Chase Mielke’s “A Letter to New Teachers”

 

by Carla L. Sparks
assistant professor of educational leadership, National Louis University

Chase Mielke nailed it in his “A Letter to New Teachers” (2019). His advice to new teachers on staving off burnout is exactly on point, based upon my own experiences as an educator over the last 40 years.

Mielke admits that conditions affect our passion for teaching, and I agree with his conclusion that while conditions affect us, they do not define us. His strategies, or five “passion stokers” (p. 2), resonate with me.

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The Expanding Universe of Educational Leadership Standards Cross-walking the 2015 PSEL Standards and 2018 ISTE Standards

 

by Stuart Ives Carrier
associate professor, National Louis University

Since the dawn of the 21st century and the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), [2002], education leaders at school and district levels have seen their work profoundly reframed by national policies with sharply elevated expectations, accountability, and pressures on district officers, principals, teachers and school children.

NCLB was replaced in 2015 by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which assured sustained leadership accountability while emphasizing higher state-driven academic standards focused on the expanded scope of preparing American students for success in two tracks: college preparation and career readiness.

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The Importance and Complexity of Principal Leadership

by Marie Whelan, Ed.D.
chief HR officer, Hillsborough County Public Schools & adjunct professor, National Louis University

The role of the school principal has evolved over the past century from school manager dealing with the status quo to innovative instructional leader. The role has shifted from following up on requirements and keeping order to demonstrating collaborative instructional practices that ensure all learners demonstrate mastery of rigorous learning benchmarks. 1

Today’s new leaders are expected to be equipped with a new skill set to ensure our new generation of learners will be competitive in a global society. 2  The adjectives to describe the effective principal is an exhaustive list that leaves only the fearless to meet the challenge.

Numerous studies have been conducted and millions of dollars spent studying these new leadership expectations and how to best support these evolutionary leaders to meet the daily challenges in the role as effective school principal.

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Reflection on Changing the Landscape of Professional Learning

by Susan Moxley, Ed.D.
adjunct professor, National Louis University

The new normal for a school district is to operate and progress in a world of constant change. In fact, it is coming at leaders at a rapid pace which makes it challenging to keep up and maneuver through the change process in a proactive way. Too many times, leaders find themselves in a spiraling circle of reaction after reaction, trying to get out of the reactive mode. Wrapping your arms around the change process is challenging as best. This deals with a management process that is critical to getting the right work done.

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Leading by Empowerment A Leader’s Suggestion

by Jonathan Grantham, Ed.D.
deputy superintendent of Marion County Public Schools and adjunct professor at National Louis University

A topic that has always fascinated me within leadership is power. I know that might sound a bit strange, but I always wanted to know how power was earned and how leaders can use their positions of power to truly make positive change.

I have witnessed people, throughout my 21-year career, misuse their power. I have watched it corrupt people. I have seen power destroy organizational culture. I have observed power destroy personal relationships. However, I have seen people use power beautifully as well.

I have worked for people who truly understood the significance of their position and enabled others to lead and think freely. I have been fortunate enough to closely witness district leaders honor their colleagues and share their power. I have watched superintendents trust in their people and empower others around them. This brief discussion is intended to define power, to identify where power comes from, to discuss the ugly terms of power, to embrace the appropriate ways to use power, and to use power to lead and guide others to positive success.

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A Quest to Define Competencies for Top School Leaders

by Jim Schott
professor emeritus, National Louis University

Seven years ago, I decided to write a book about the leadership and management competencies superintendents and other top school and district leaders might need to be successful in today’s world. And the first thing I did was contact Dr. Linton Deck.

Deck was one of most intelligent and knowledgeable educational leaders I had ever met. He was a voracious reader who knew so much about almost any subject or topic one might raise. He was always interesting and ready to tell a great story—as well as some good clean jokes. And he continuously was on a mission to discover new information and ways to use it.

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