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Bold Film Takes Honest Look At Mental Illness, Profiles People Who Recovered NLU hosting the only Illinois screening, discussion of 'Healing Voices'

invite2In the social action documentary “Healing Voices,” three people who recovered from severe mental illness reveal what the experience was like for them, and how they healed. The producers used that as a springboard to examine “what we talk about when we talk about mental illness.”

All are invited to see the film premiere at its only Illinois screening, at National Louis University’s Chicago campus, Friday, April 29, followed by a discussion of the issues. More than 100 sites worldwide will show the film at its non-theatrical release that day. Doors at National Louis, 122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill, will open at 6 p.m. for popcorn and networking, with the screening to begin at 6:30 p.m. A discussion will follow until 9 p.m. Admission is free.

While some mental health patients say psychiatric medications saved their lives, and the director wanted the movie to be apolitical, some of those profiled in the film recovered from serious mental illness without drugs. The documentary tracked their progress over five years. One said mental illness is when “mind, body and spirit are in discord.” Another said he viewed the voices in his head as a gift, but his therapist did not share that interpretation. Continue reading »

Scientist Outlines Climate Change Dangers in Earth Week Event Seth Darling of Argonne National Lab calls for changes to reduce CO2 threat

 

DSCN0641 - Version 2The story of climate change ranges from drilling holes in Arctic ice to measure Earth’s air temperatures over the past million years, bracing for the jump in the use of fossil fuels as China and India industrialize and predicting which coastal cities will be submerged due to global warming.

But mostly, climate change is the story of energy—where we get it, how we use it and whether it’s renewable, said Seth B. Darling, Ph.D., who holds a joint appointment as a scientist with the Argonne National Laboratory and as a Fellow in the Institute of Molecular Engineering at University of Chicago.  He presented a “Global Climate Change: The Path to a Sustainable Future” lecture April 20 at the Lisle campus to mark Earth Week, and NLU Environmental Committee representatives also led discussions of his points at the Wheeling campus. Continue reading »

Conference Uses Law, Arts, To Reframe and Seek End to Racial Injustice Acts by public authorities examined as torture, genocide for Americans of color

160408-racial-justice-conference-017A diverse group of musicians, Harvard Law School students, artists, academics and activists came together April 8-9 to take a long, hard look at racial injustice at the “Racial Injustice: Terror, Torture, and Trauma/Collaboration, Resistance, and Liberation” conference held at NLU.

Manifestations of racial injustice, such as police beatings, police shootings and outsized  incarceration rates for people of color,  are viewed as routine by many Americans, if they think of them at all. But conference participants sought to declare they are not “normal” and to reframe them as torture and genocide.

A team of Harvard Law School students discussed the definition of torture and said some of the human rights injustices forced on people of color by public authorities meets the definition. Continue reading »

Safe Zone Allies Prepare To Support LGBTQ Individuals at NLU Get a glimpse of how LGBTQ people encounter society

SafeZone_logoWhat does the world look like through the eyes of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning person, and why is it so often harsh? Why are public restrooms so scary for transgender people? What do the newer terms gender fluid, cisgender, intersex and non-binary mean?

About 10 NLU staff and faculty members learned the answers to these and other questions when Amanda DaSilva, associate director of student development, facilitated a training in late January on how to become Safe Zone Allies, meaning participants are willing to offer support to LGBTQ students and others.

The attendees got a sobering look at why LGBTQ individuals might breathe a sigh of relief at finding a safe zone. Continue reading »

NLU Heralds the ‘Every Student Succeeds Act’ Education Law NLU's statement on the new legislation, which replaces No Child Left Behind

By Rob Muller, Dean of National Louis University’s National College of Education, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education, and Senior Advisor to the Deputy Secretary of Education at the U.S. Department of Education.

Obama-ESSA

President Barack Obama greets eighth-grader Sofia Rios and the other stage participants prior to a bill signing ceremony for S. 1177, Every Student Succeeds Act, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building Dec. 10, 2015. Official White House photo by Pete Souza.

We are pleased to note the December 10 enactment of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the long overdue successor to No Child Left Behind. After years of negotiations and political gridlock, this bill is the result of a bipartisan effort that was overwhelmingly approved by the Senate and House, and signed by the President.

The new law’s provisions regarding teacher evaluation, standards and accountability, investments in early childhood education, innovation and other priority initiatives are worthy of note.

The new law shifts primary implementation responsibility from the federal to state and local government, providing us with a significant opportunity to address some of the shortfalls of No Child Left behind, while simultaneously reaffirming our commitment to high standards and educational excellence for all learners, regardless of race, ethnicity, socio-economic or educational advantage. We hope that state and local leaders will take advantage of these changes to support what is best for our students, and effective educational practice.

For over 100 years, the National College of Education has been an innovator in preparing educators to help all students succeed. In coming months, we will be working with our colleagues in Illinois and nationally to ensure that the law’s enactment provides for the best educator and teacher preparation possible.

To help make that possible, we’ll be in communication with the more than 50,000 National Louis University education graduates across the state and nation. We’re looking forward to ESSA’s effective implementation in the best interest or America’s students, teachers and families.